Due to the current Covid-19 lock-down, all purchases have been disabled. We hope to help you again soon :)

Pterinopelma sazimai
-Brazilian Blue

Adult Size: 14-15cm

Type: New World, Terrestrial, Opportunistic Burrower, Webber

Growth Rate: Medium to fast

Temperament: Nervous to Skittish

Lifespan: Unknown

Origin: Eastern Brazil

Recommended Climate: Summer 24-28°C, Winter 22-24°C

Recommended Humidity: Summer 70-80%, Winter 60-70%

Basic Enclosure Requirements: Terrestrial setup with at least 4 x the size of the spider in horizontal space, around 10cm of substrate with a shelter and a water dish. Rocks and structure to attach webbing is also necessary with this species.

Photo Credit: Chase Campbell (CEC Arachnoboards) | ArachnoshopSA

This product is currently out of stock and unavailable.

Description

Common names: Brazilian Blue | Iridescent Blue Tarantula

Another beautiful tarantula from South America. Found in the Bahia, Minas Gerais and Chapada Diamantina areas of Brazil (currently) this stunning blue tarantula is also gaining a lot of popularity with hobbyists around the world. They look black at first with reddish hairs/setae on their abdomen, but with some added light, the blue comes shining through.

The territory they are found in is reportedly quite harsh, getting very cold in the winter nights and very hot on summer days, which the tarantula will self regulate with it’s opportunistic burrowing behaviour These tarantulas have also displayed some arboreal traits so provide a lot of structure in your enclosures with a decent amount of substrate to allow for burrowing if they choose to.

They are known to be reasonable to work with, only show nervousness or skittish behaviour when startled or pestered, to which they will reply by flicking urticating bristles at you if the annoyance continues. However, as per some of the videos on YouTube, some keepers elect to handle their Pterinopelma sazimai tarantulas because the risk of a bite is reasonably low.

If you can get one, get one! They are  currently very scarce in South Africa with very few people keeping and even less breeding them.